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17 Office Snacks to Help Overcome That Afternoon Slump

17 Office Snacks to Help Overcome That Afternoon Slump


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Chia seeds are a trendy superfood, but their natural B vitamin content makes them an easy answer to your midday fatigue

We’ve all experienced that overwhelming exhaustion that rolls in around 2 or 3 p.m., and while midday fatigue may be attributed to low blood sugar or missing your morning coffee, it is most likely due to a disruption in your sleep cycle. We often wake up despite still being tired and by midday our core temperatures begin to drop, which is a signal for the brain to release melatonin — the exact process that our body goes through before bed. Many Mediterranean and tropical cultures structure their days around this by incorporating a midday siesta into their daily schedules; in the United States, we’re not quite there yet.

Click here for the 17 Office Snacks to Help Overcome That Afternoon Slump Slideshow

What we eat for breakfast and lunch also contributes to our daily energy levels, and when we’re working an eight-hour shift at the office it’s crucial we remain alert for all of it (all right, at least most of it). Refined carbohydrates such as white bread, bagels, and other breakfast pastries have a high glycemic index and are quickly broken down by the body into sugar. They give a quick spike of sugar — then a crash — rather than a steady stream of energy throughout the day.

To avoid the afternoon slump, you need to stock your desk and office refrigerator with proper snacks that will fuel you through the day. Fruits like apples and bananas are a convenient form of slow releasing carbohydrates, while hard-boiled eggs provide satiating protein and B vitamins — nutrients critical to the conversion of food into energy.

Eat these 17 office snacks, and avoid falling victim to that afternoon slump.


ABC Everyday: Nathan Nankervis

Many of us have heard that napping during the day is a complete no-no for those wishing to sleep well at night.

Healthy snack ideas to get you through the afternoon slump

Here's how to identify whether you're actually hungry, and what healthy snacks to opt for.

But napping is actually a great way to catch up on sleep, as long as you don't have a sleep disorder, says Dr David Cunnington, sleep physician and co-director of the Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

"Someone who, through their working day, has an opportunity to take 10 minutes in the corner" should do so if that works for them, he says.

"Power napping is a great strategy to help get through the rest of the day."

Dr Leon Lack, an Emeritus Professor at Flinders University's School of Psychology, found in a study he co-authored that a brief nap can actually help you feel more productive.

A short nap of about 10 minutes can give you "that refreshed feeling when you wake up afterwards, and that lasts for hours," says Dr Lack.

Coping when you haven't had enough sleep

From snacks to walks in the sun, these things might help you get through the day when you haven't had enough sleep.

He recommends setting your alarm for 20 minutes (to allow a few minutes to drift off).

But beware — naps of 30 minutes or more can leave you feeling lethargic for 10 to 30 minutes afterwards because they can mean waking in the middle of deeper sleep.

"And if you sleep for half an hour or longer, then that's much more likely to interfere a bit with your sleep at night-time," Dr Lack says.

The verdict: Go ahead and nap, but set your alarm.


ABC Everyday: Nathan Nankervis

Many of us have heard that napping during the day is a complete no-no for those wishing to sleep well at night.

Healthy snack ideas to get you through the afternoon slump

Here's how to identify whether you're actually hungry, and what healthy snacks to opt for.

But napping is actually a great way to catch up on sleep, as long as you don't have a sleep disorder, says Dr David Cunnington, sleep physician and co-director of the Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

"Someone who, through their working day, has an opportunity to take 10 minutes in the corner" should do so if that works for them, he says.

"Power napping is a great strategy to help get through the rest of the day."

Dr Leon Lack, an Emeritus Professor at Flinders University's School of Psychology, found in a study he co-authored that a brief nap can actually help you feel more productive.

A short nap of about 10 minutes can give you "that refreshed feeling when you wake up afterwards, and that lasts for hours," says Dr Lack.

Coping when you haven't had enough sleep

From snacks to walks in the sun, these things might help you get through the day when you haven't had enough sleep.

He recommends setting your alarm for 20 minutes (to allow a few minutes to drift off).

But beware — naps of 30 minutes or more can leave you feeling lethargic for 10 to 30 minutes afterwards because they can mean waking in the middle of deeper sleep.

"And if you sleep for half an hour or longer, then that's much more likely to interfere a bit with your sleep at night-time," Dr Lack says.

The verdict: Go ahead and nap, but set your alarm.


ABC Everyday: Nathan Nankervis

Many of us have heard that napping during the day is a complete no-no for those wishing to sleep well at night.

Healthy snack ideas to get you through the afternoon slump

Here's how to identify whether you're actually hungry, and what healthy snacks to opt for.

But napping is actually a great way to catch up on sleep, as long as you don't have a sleep disorder, says Dr David Cunnington, sleep physician and co-director of the Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

"Someone who, through their working day, has an opportunity to take 10 minutes in the corner" should do so if that works for them, he says.

"Power napping is a great strategy to help get through the rest of the day."

Dr Leon Lack, an Emeritus Professor at Flinders University's School of Psychology, found in a study he co-authored that a brief nap can actually help you feel more productive.

A short nap of about 10 minutes can give you "that refreshed feeling when you wake up afterwards, and that lasts for hours," says Dr Lack.

Coping when you haven't had enough sleep

From snacks to walks in the sun, these things might help you get through the day when you haven't had enough sleep.

He recommends setting your alarm for 20 minutes (to allow a few minutes to drift off).

But beware — naps of 30 minutes or more can leave you feeling lethargic for 10 to 30 minutes afterwards because they can mean waking in the middle of deeper sleep.

"And if you sleep for half an hour or longer, then that's much more likely to interfere a bit with your sleep at night-time," Dr Lack says.

The verdict: Go ahead and nap, but set your alarm.


ABC Everyday: Nathan Nankervis

Many of us have heard that napping during the day is a complete no-no for those wishing to sleep well at night.

Healthy snack ideas to get you through the afternoon slump

Here's how to identify whether you're actually hungry, and what healthy snacks to opt for.

But napping is actually a great way to catch up on sleep, as long as you don't have a sleep disorder, says Dr David Cunnington, sleep physician and co-director of the Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

"Someone who, through their working day, has an opportunity to take 10 minutes in the corner" should do so if that works for them, he says.

"Power napping is a great strategy to help get through the rest of the day."

Dr Leon Lack, an Emeritus Professor at Flinders University's School of Psychology, found in a study he co-authored that a brief nap can actually help you feel more productive.

A short nap of about 10 minutes can give you "that refreshed feeling when you wake up afterwards, and that lasts for hours," says Dr Lack.

Coping when you haven't had enough sleep

From snacks to walks in the sun, these things might help you get through the day when you haven't had enough sleep.

He recommends setting your alarm for 20 minutes (to allow a few minutes to drift off).

But beware — naps of 30 minutes or more can leave you feeling lethargic for 10 to 30 minutes afterwards because they can mean waking in the middle of deeper sleep.

"And if you sleep for half an hour or longer, then that's much more likely to interfere a bit with your sleep at night-time," Dr Lack says.

The verdict: Go ahead and nap, but set your alarm.


ABC Everyday: Nathan Nankervis

Many of us have heard that napping during the day is a complete no-no for those wishing to sleep well at night.

Healthy snack ideas to get you through the afternoon slump

Here's how to identify whether you're actually hungry, and what healthy snacks to opt for.

But napping is actually a great way to catch up on sleep, as long as you don't have a sleep disorder, says Dr David Cunnington, sleep physician and co-director of the Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

"Someone who, through their working day, has an opportunity to take 10 minutes in the corner" should do so if that works for them, he says.

"Power napping is a great strategy to help get through the rest of the day."

Dr Leon Lack, an Emeritus Professor at Flinders University's School of Psychology, found in a study he co-authored that a brief nap can actually help you feel more productive.

A short nap of about 10 minutes can give you "that refreshed feeling when you wake up afterwards, and that lasts for hours," says Dr Lack.

Coping when you haven't had enough sleep

From snacks to walks in the sun, these things might help you get through the day when you haven't had enough sleep.

He recommends setting your alarm for 20 minutes (to allow a few minutes to drift off).

But beware — naps of 30 minutes or more can leave you feeling lethargic for 10 to 30 minutes afterwards because they can mean waking in the middle of deeper sleep.

"And if you sleep for half an hour or longer, then that's much more likely to interfere a bit with your sleep at night-time," Dr Lack says.

The verdict: Go ahead and nap, but set your alarm.


ABC Everyday: Nathan Nankervis

Many of us have heard that napping during the day is a complete no-no for those wishing to sleep well at night.

Healthy snack ideas to get you through the afternoon slump

Here's how to identify whether you're actually hungry, and what healthy snacks to opt for.

But napping is actually a great way to catch up on sleep, as long as you don't have a sleep disorder, says Dr David Cunnington, sleep physician and co-director of the Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

"Someone who, through their working day, has an opportunity to take 10 minutes in the corner" should do so if that works for them, he says.

"Power napping is a great strategy to help get through the rest of the day."

Dr Leon Lack, an Emeritus Professor at Flinders University's School of Psychology, found in a study he co-authored that a brief nap can actually help you feel more productive.

A short nap of about 10 minutes can give you "that refreshed feeling when you wake up afterwards, and that lasts for hours," says Dr Lack.

Coping when you haven't had enough sleep

From snacks to walks in the sun, these things might help you get through the day when you haven't had enough sleep.

He recommends setting your alarm for 20 minutes (to allow a few minutes to drift off).

But beware — naps of 30 minutes or more can leave you feeling lethargic for 10 to 30 minutes afterwards because they can mean waking in the middle of deeper sleep.

"And if you sleep for half an hour or longer, then that's much more likely to interfere a bit with your sleep at night-time," Dr Lack says.

The verdict: Go ahead and nap, but set your alarm.


ABC Everyday: Nathan Nankervis

Many of us have heard that napping during the day is a complete no-no for those wishing to sleep well at night.

Healthy snack ideas to get you through the afternoon slump

Here's how to identify whether you're actually hungry, and what healthy snacks to opt for.

But napping is actually a great way to catch up on sleep, as long as you don't have a sleep disorder, says Dr David Cunnington, sleep physician and co-director of the Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

"Someone who, through their working day, has an opportunity to take 10 minutes in the corner" should do so if that works for them, he says.

"Power napping is a great strategy to help get through the rest of the day."

Dr Leon Lack, an Emeritus Professor at Flinders University's School of Psychology, found in a study he co-authored that a brief nap can actually help you feel more productive.

A short nap of about 10 minutes can give you "that refreshed feeling when you wake up afterwards, and that lasts for hours," says Dr Lack.

Coping when you haven't had enough sleep

From snacks to walks in the sun, these things might help you get through the day when you haven't had enough sleep.

He recommends setting your alarm for 20 minutes (to allow a few minutes to drift off).

But beware — naps of 30 minutes or more can leave you feeling lethargic for 10 to 30 minutes afterwards because they can mean waking in the middle of deeper sleep.

"And if you sleep for half an hour or longer, then that's much more likely to interfere a bit with your sleep at night-time," Dr Lack says.

The verdict: Go ahead and nap, but set your alarm.


ABC Everyday: Nathan Nankervis

Many of us have heard that napping during the day is a complete no-no for those wishing to sleep well at night.

Healthy snack ideas to get you through the afternoon slump

Here's how to identify whether you're actually hungry, and what healthy snacks to opt for.

But napping is actually a great way to catch up on sleep, as long as you don't have a sleep disorder, says Dr David Cunnington, sleep physician and co-director of the Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

"Someone who, through their working day, has an opportunity to take 10 minutes in the corner" should do so if that works for them, he says.

"Power napping is a great strategy to help get through the rest of the day."

Dr Leon Lack, an Emeritus Professor at Flinders University's School of Psychology, found in a study he co-authored that a brief nap can actually help you feel more productive.

A short nap of about 10 minutes can give you "that refreshed feeling when you wake up afterwards, and that lasts for hours," says Dr Lack.

Coping when you haven't had enough sleep

From snacks to walks in the sun, these things might help you get through the day when you haven't had enough sleep.

He recommends setting your alarm for 20 minutes (to allow a few minutes to drift off).

But beware — naps of 30 minutes or more can leave you feeling lethargic for 10 to 30 minutes afterwards because they can mean waking in the middle of deeper sleep.

"And if you sleep for half an hour or longer, then that's much more likely to interfere a bit with your sleep at night-time," Dr Lack says.

The verdict: Go ahead and nap, but set your alarm.


ABC Everyday: Nathan Nankervis

Many of us have heard that napping during the day is a complete no-no for those wishing to sleep well at night.

Healthy snack ideas to get you through the afternoon slump

Here's how to identify whether you're actually hungry, and what healthy snacks to opt for.

But napping is actually a great way to catch up on sleep, as long as you don't have a sleep disorder, says Dr David Cunnington, sleep physician and co-director of the Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

"Someone who, through their working day, has an opportunity to take 10 minutes in the corner" should do so if that works for them, he says.

"Power napping is a great strategy to help get through the rest of the day."

Dr Leon Lack, an Emeritus Professor at Flinders University's School of Psychology, found in a study he co-authored that a brief nap can actually help you feel more productive.

A short nap of about 10 minutes can give you "that refreshed feeling when you wake up afterwards, and that lasts for hours," says Dr Lack.

Coping when you haven't had enough sleep

From snacks to walks in the sun, these things might help you get through the day when you haven't had enough sleep.

He recommends setting your alarm for 20 minutes (to allow a few minutes to drift off).

But beware — naps of 30 minutes or more can leave you feeling lethargic for 10 to 30 minutes afterwards because they can mean waking in the middle of deeper sleep.

"And if you sleep for half an hour or longer, then that's much more likely to interfere a bit with your sleep at night-time," Dr Lack says.

The verdict: Go ahead and nap, but set your alarm.


ABC Everyday: Nathan Nankervis

Many of us have heard that napping during the day is a complete no-no for those wishing to sleep well at night.

Healthy snack ideas to get you through the afternoon slump

Here's how to identify whether you're actually hungry, and what healthy snacks to opt for.

But napping is actually a great way to catch up on sleep, as long as you don't have a sleep disorder, says Dr David Cunnington, sleep physician and co-director of the Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

"Someone who, through their working day, has an opportunity to take 10 minutes in the corner" should do so if that works for them, he says.

"Power napping is a great strategy to help get through the rest of the day."

Dr Leon Lack, an Emeritus Professor at Flinders University's School of Psychology, found in a study he co-authored that a brief nap can actually help you feel more productive.

A short nap of about 10 minutes can give you "that refreshed feeling when you wake up afterwards, and that lasts for hours," says Dr Lack.

Coping when you haven't had enough sleep

From snacks to walks in the sun, these things might help you get through the day when you haven't had enough sleep.

He recommends setting your alarm for 20 minutes (to allow a few minutes to drift off).

But beware — naps of 30 minutes or more can leave you feeling lethargic for 10 to 30 minutes afterwards because they can mean waking in the middle of deeper sleep.

"And if you sleep for half an hour or longer, then that's much more likely to interfere a bit with your sleep at night-time," Dr Lack says.

The verdict: Go ahead and nap, but set your alarm.