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Kellogg’s Pledges Completely Cage-Free Sourcing of Eggs by 2025

Kellogg’s Pledges Completely Cage-Free Sourcing of Eggs by 2025


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“We have a role to play in influencing responsible behavior throughout our supply chain,” the company said in a press release

The Kellogg Company will begin eliminating gestation crates and sourcing its eggs exclusively from cage-free chickens.

The Kellogg Company — whose products include Rice Krispies, Pop Tarts, Eggo, and Frosted Flakes — will eliminate gestation crates from its pork supply chain, and source only cage-free eggs, the company announced in a press release.

“Even though we are a grains-based company and use very few animal products in our foods, we understand that we have a role to play in influencing responsible behavior throughout our supply chain,” said Paul Norman, president of Kellogg North America. “Today’s announcement allows us to lead positive change in a way we know gives consumers more of what they want from brands and companies — a strong focus on social responsibility.”

Kellogg’s announcement follows in the footsteps of similar efforts from other industry leaders to make sustainable changes to its business practices, including McDonald’s and Starbucks.

“We are proud of the progress we've made to date as we've sourced an increasing number of cage-free eggs,” said Diane Holdorf, Kellogg’s chief sustainability officer. “While we hope these transitions come sooner than 2025, we understand that the development of alternative housing methods takes time and are committed to working with our suppliers to establish the appropriate path forward.”


McDonald’s September 2015 decision to transition to eggs reared in cage-free facilities is viewed by many industry commentators as a defining moment for the global egg industry. The company, which serves two billion eggs per year in the US alone, announced its commitment to cease using eggs from hens housed in conventional cages by 2025. Following the announcement, a cascade of food industry corporations pledged to follow suit. In early 2016, the number of companies promising to source cage-free eggs increased exponentially. By April, close to 50 grocery chains and a further 40 restaurant chains had promised changes to their buying policies and, in May alone, a further 30 US companies moved to align their companies with industry sentiment, along with food service and cruise companies (WattAgNet).

Sysco Corps, the world’s largest foodservice distributor, has committed to sourcing only cage-free eggs across its entire US supply chain by 2026. With sales of $48.7 billion in 2015, the company is bigger than McDonalds and adds considerable weight to the movement away from battery farming (ecowatch.com). Walt Disney pledged to use only cage-free eggs in its parks and on its cruise ships by the end of 2016, pushing other corporations to fast-track their own transitions. For those seeking local relevance, multinational retail corporation Walmart (Makro/Game/Jumbo Cash & Carry) announced in April that it would make the transition in its US operations by 2025, whilst Nestlé has now promised to completely overhaul their US egg supply chain within the next five years. Kellogg’s and Unilever have also signed pledges.


McDonald’s September 2015 decision to transition to eggs reared in cage-free facilities is viewed by many industry commentators as a defining moment for the global egg industry. The company, which serves two billion eggs per year in the US alone, announced its commitment to cease using eggs from hens housed in conventional cages by 2025. Following the announcement, a cascade of food industry corporations pledged to follow suit. In early 2016, the number of companies promising to source cage-free eggs increased exponentially. By April, close to 50 grocery chains and a further 40 restaurant chains had promised changes to their buying policies and, in May alone, a further 30 US companies moved to align their companies with industry sentiment, along with food service and cruise companies (WattAgNet).

Sysco Corps, the world’s largest foodservice distributor, has committed to sourcing only cage-free eggs across its entire US supply chain by 2026. With sales of $48.7 billion in 2015, the company is bigger than McDonalds and adds considerable weight to the movement away from battery farming (ecowatch.com). Walt Disney pledged to use only cage-free eggs in its parks and on its cruise ships by the end of 2016, pushing other corporations to fast-track their own transitions. For those seeking local relevance, multinational retail corporation Walmart (Makro/Game/Jumbo Cash & Carry) announced in April that it would make the transition in its US operations by 2025, whilst Nestlé has now promised to completely overhaul their US egg supply chain within the next five years. Kellogg’s and Unilever have also signed pledges.


McDonald’s September 2015 decision to transition to eggs reared in cage-free facilities is viewed by many industry commentators as a defining moment for the global egg industry. The company, which serves two billion eggs per year in the US alone, announced its commitment to cease using eggs from hens housed in conventional cages by 2025. Following the announcement, a cascade of food industry corporations pledged to follow suit. In early 2016, the number of companies promising to source cage-free eggs increased exponentially. By April, close to 50 grocery chains and a further 40 restaurant chains had promised changes to their buying policies and, in May alone, a further 30 US companies moved to align their companies with industry sentiment, along with food service and cruise companies (WattAgNet).

Sysco Corps, the world’s largest foodservice distributor, has committed to sourcing only cage-free eggs across its entire US supply chain by 2026. With sales of $48.7 billion in 2015, the company is bigger than McDonalds and adds considerable weight to the movement away from battery farming (ecowatch.com). Walt Disney pledged to use only cage-free eggs in its parks and on its cruise ships by the end of 2016, pushing other corporations to fast-track their own transitions. For those seeking local relevance, multinational retail corporation Walmart (Makro/Game/Jumbo Cash & Carry) announced in April that it would make the transition in its US operations by 2025, whilst Nestlé has now promised to completely overhaul their US egg supply chain within the next five years. Kellogg’s and Unilever have also signed pledges.


McDonald’s September 2015 decision to transition to eggs reared in cage-free facilities is viewed by many industry commentators as a defining moment for the global egg industry. The company, which serves two billion eggs per year in the US alone, announced its commitment to cease using eggs from hens housed in conventional cages by 2025. Following the announcement, a cascade of food industry corporations pledged to follow suit. In early 2016, the number of companies promising to source cage-free eggs increased exponentially. By April, close to 50 grocery chains and a further 40 restaurant chains had promised changes to their buying policies and, in May alone, a further 30 US companies moved to align their companies with industry sentiment, along with food service and cruise companies (WattAgNet).

Sysco Corps, the world’s largest foodservice distributor, has committed to sourcing only cage-free eggs across its entire US supply chain by 2026. With sales of $48.7 billion in 2015, the company is bigger than McDonalds and adds considerable weight to the movement away from battery farming (ecowatch.com). Walt Disney pledged to use only cage-free eggs in its parks and on its cruise ships by the end of 2016, pushing other corporations to fast-track their own transitions. For those seeking local relevance, multinational retail corporation Walmart (Makro/Game/Jumbo Cash & Carry) announced in April that it would make the transition in its US operations by 2025, whilst Nestlé has now promised to completely overhaul their US egg supply chain within the next five years. Kellogg’s and Unilever have also signed pledges.


McDonald’s September 2015 decision to transition to eggs reared in cage-free facilities is viewed by many industry commentators as a defining moment for the global egg industry. The company, which serves two billion eggs per year in the US alone, announced its commitment to cease using eggs from hens housed in conventional cages by 2025. Following the announcement, a cascade of food industry corporations pledged to follow suit. In early 2016, the number of companies promising to source cage-free eggs increased exponentially. By April, close to 50 grocery chains and a further 40 restaurant chains had promised changes to their buying policies and, in May alone, a further 30 US companies moved to align their companies with industry sentiment, along with food service and cruise companies (WattAgNet).

Sysco Corps, the world’s largest foodservice distributor, has committed to sourcing only cage-free eggs across its entire US supply chain by 2026. With sales of $48.7 billion in 2015, the company is bigger than McDonalds and adds considerable weight to the movement away from battery farming (ecowatch.com). Walt Disney pledged to use only cage-free eggs in its parks and on its cruise ships by the end of 2016, pushing other corporations to fast-track their own transitions. For those seeking local relevance, multinational retail corporation Walmart (Makro/Game/Jumbo Cash & Carry) announced in April that it would make the transition in its US operations by 2025, whilst Nestlé has now promised to completely overhaul their US egg supply chain within the next five years. Kellogg’s and Unilever have also signed pledges.


McDonald’s September 2015 decision to transition to eggs reared in cage-free facilities is viewed by many industry commentators as a defining moment for the global egg industry. The company, which serves two billion eggs per year in the US alone, announced its commitment to cease using eggs from hens housed in conventional cages by 2025. Following the announcement, a cascade of food industry corporations pledged to follow suit. In early 2016, the number of companies promising to source cage-free eggs increased exponentially. By April, close to 50 grocery chains and a further 40 restaurant chains had promised changes to their buying policies and, in May alone, a further 30 US companies moved to align their companies with industry sentiment, along with food service and cruise companies (WattAgNet).

Sysco Corps, the world’s largest foodservice distributor, has committed to sourcing only cage-free eggs across its entire US supply chain by 2026. With sales of $48.7 billion in 2015, the company is bigger than McDonalds and adds considerable weight to the movement away from battery farming (ecowatch.com). Walt Disney pledged to use only cage-free eggs in its parks and on its cruise ships by the end of 2016, pushing other corporations to fast-track their own transitions. For those seeking local relevance, multinational retail corporation Walmart (Makro/Game/Jumbo Cash & Carry) announced in April that it would make the transition in its US operations by 2025, whilst Nestlé has now promised to completely overhaul their US egg supply chain within the next five years. Kellogg’s and Unilever have also signed pledges.


McDonald’s September 2015 decision to transition to eggs reared in cage-free facilities is viewed by many industry commentators as a defining moment for the global egg industry. The company, which serves two billion eggs per year in the US alone, announced its commitment to cease using eggs from hens housed in conventional cages by 2025. Following the announcement, a cascade of food industry corporations pledged to follow suit. In early 2016, the number of companies promising to source cage-free eggs increased exponentially. By April, close to 50 grocery chains and a further 40 restaurant chains had promised changes to their buying policies and, in May alone, a further 30 US companies moved to align their companies with industry sentiment, along with food service and cruise companies (WattAgNet).

Sysco Corps, the world’s largest foodservice distributor, has committed to sourcing only cage-free eggs across its entire US supply chain by 2026. With sales of $48.7 billion in 2015, the company is bigger than McDonalds and adds considerable weight to the movement away from battery farming (ecowatch.com). Walt Disney pledged to use only cage-free eggs in its parks and on its cruise ships by the end of 2016, pushing other corporations to fast-track their own transitions. For those seeking local relevance, multinational retail corporation Walmart (Makro/Game/Jumbo Cash & Carry) announced in April that it would make the transition in its US operations by 2025, whilst Nestlé has now promised to completely overhaul their US egg supply chain within the next five years. Kellogg’s and Unilever have also signed pledges.


McDonald’s September 2015 decision to transition to eggs reared in cage-free facilities is viewed by many industry commentators as a defining moment for the global egg industry. The company, which serves two billion eggs per year in the US alone, announced its commitment to cease using eggs from hens housed in conventional cages by 2025. Following the announcement, a cascade of food industry corporations pledged to follow suit. In early 2016, the number of companies promising to source cage-free eggs increased exponentially. By April, close to 50 grocery chains and a further 40 restaurant chains had promised changes to their buying policies and, in May alone, a further 30 US companies moved to align their companies with industry sentiment, along with food service and cruise companies (WattAgNet).

Sysco Corps, the world’s largest foodservice distributor, has committed to sourcing only cage-free eggs across its entire US supply chain by 2026. With sales of $48.7 billion in 2015, the company is bigger than McDonalds and adds considerable weight to the movement away from battery farming (ecowatch.com). Walt Disney pledged to use only cage-free eggs in its parks and on its cruise ships by the end of 2016, pushing other corporations to fast-track their own transitions. For those seeking local relevance, multinational retail corporation Walmart (Makro/Game/Jumbo Cash & Carry) announced in April that it would make the transition in its US operations by 2025, whilst Nestlé has now promised to completely overhaul their US egg supply chain within the next five years. Kellogg’s and Unilever have also signed pledges.


McDonald’s September 2015 decision to transition to eggs reared in cage-free facilities is viewed by many industry commentators as a defining moment for the global egg industry. The company, which serves two billion eggs per year in the US alone, announced its commitment to cease using eggs from hens housed in conventional cages by 2025. Following the announcement, a cascade of food industry corporations pledged to follow suit. In early 2016, the number of companies promising to source cage-free eggs increased exponentially. By April, close to 50 grocery chains and a further 40 restaurant chains had promised changes to their buying policies and, in May alone, a further 30 US companies moved to align their companies with industry sentiment, along with food service and cruise companies (WattAgNet).

Sysco Corps, the world’s largest foodservice distributor, has committed to sourcing only cage-free eggs across its entire US supply chain by 2026. With sales of $48.7 billion in 2015, the company is bigger than McDonalds and adds considerable weight to the movement away from battery farming (ecowatch.com). Walt Disney pledged to use only cage-free eggs in its parks and on its cruise ships by the end of 2016, pushing other corporations to fast-track their own transitions. For those seeking local relevance, multinational retail corporation Walmart (Makro/Game/Jumbo Cash & Carry) announced in April that it would make the transition in its US operations by 2025, whilst Nestlé has now promised to completely overhaul their US egg supply chain within the next five years. Kellogg’s and Unilever have also signed pledges.


McDonald’s September 2015 decision to transition to eggs reared in cage-free facilities is viewed by many industry commentators as a defining moment for the global egg industry. The company, which serves two billion eggs per year in the US alone, announced its commitment to cease using eggs from hens housed in conventional cages by 2025. Following the announcement, a cascade of food industry corporations pledged to follow suit. In early 2016, the number of companies promising to source cage-free eggs increased exponentially. By April, close to 50 grocery chains and a further 40 restaurant chains had promised changes to their buying policies and, in May alone, a further 30 US companies moved to align their companies with industry sentiment, along with food service and cruise companies (WattAgNet).

Sysco Corps, the world’s largest foodservice distributor, has committed to sourcing only cage-free eggs across its entire US supply chain by 2026. With sales of $48.7 billion in 2015, the company is bigger than McDonalds and adds considerable weight to the movement away from battery farming (ecowatch.com). Walt Disney pledged to use only cage-free eggs in its parks and on its cruise ships by the end of 2016, pushing other corporations to fast-track their own transitions. For those seeking local relevance, multinational retail corporation Walmart (Makro/Game/Jumbo Cash & Carry) announced in April that it would make the transition in its US operations by 2025, whilst Nestlé has now promised to completely overhaul their US egg supply chain within the next five years. Kellogg’s and Unilever have also signed pledges.


Watch the video: Magnolia Chicken: Cage-Free Brown Eggs (June 2022).


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