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Outstanding Old Marsannay Rosés

Outstanding Old Marsannay Rosés


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I have always maintained that rosés do not have to be consumed the first year they are offered for sale. Many can be kept for years and many improve with additional age (to read an article on this subject click here). This allows for buying rosés and keeping them for some years and also offers a great opportunity to people in the know to take advantage of the close out sales on rosés that occur late in the year that rosés are first sold and into the next year as the new vintage is arriving.

Recently I had the opportunity to enjoy drinking some older Marsannay Rosés from the esteemed Burgundy producer Joseph Roty. Here is some information on Marsannay and Marsannay Rosé taken from my recent article on 2015 rosés (to read that article click here).

Historically Burgundy has not been a producer of rosé wines. Marsannay is the northern most village in Burgundy and only assumed village status in 1987. It has no Grand Cru or Premier Cru vineyards. Before 1987, grapes in this area were used to make regional wines – red, white, and rosé. The production of those wines has continued with Marsannay now the only village in Burgundy to make all 3 types of wines – Pinot Noir for the red wines and rosés and Chardonnay for the white wines. However, there are not many Marsannays imported and the production is quite small. With respect to the Marsannay Rosés, they are really special with a lot of character and they benefit from some bottle age.

These Domaine Joseph Roty Marsannay Rosés definitely benefitted from bottle age. The wines were from the 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2013 vintages. I tasted all of the wines over a period of 3 weeks with the wines left in the refrigerator with the corks inserted. None of the wines showed any sign of fatigue over this entire period. They were all delicious. The wines were slightly different to be sure, but all were beautifully balanced and a pleasure to drink. I enjoyed all of them and did not have a favorite. And, yes I drank all of them over the 3-week time period and enjoyed every sip!

2009 Domaine Joseph Roty Marsannay Rosé
Very light reddish orange color with a golden hue this 7 year-old rosé is fully mature and showing wonderful complexity. It has a gorgeous floral perfume with an exotic tinge and has lovely fruit with suggestions of mulberry and a faint exotic spiciness. A nice crispness gives the wine a lift and balances the fruit. Delicious now this rosé will continue to give great pleasure for some years into the future – Outstanding.

2010 Domaine Joseph Roty Marsannay Rosé
Pale pink in color with a golden hue this 6-year old rosé is very youthful. It has a very attractive floral and briary perfume with hints of raspberry and is very elegant and finesseful with beautiful balance. Faint hints of raspberry and citrus are offset by a faint spiciness and the wine is flavorful with a nice underlying crispness. This is a delicious rosé that will be drinking beautifully for many more years – Outstanding.

2011 Domaine Joseph Roty Marsannay Rosé
Very light orange pink in color with a golden hue and golden edge this 2011 rosé has a subtle floral perfume with a kiss of spice. It is bright and crisp with berry nuances and a very faint spiciness. This rosé is youthful and very attractive yet at 5 years of age it will drink beautifully for many more years – Outstanding.

2013 Domaine Joseph Roty Marsannay Rosé
Very light reddish pink in color this 2013 rosé has a lovely perfume with hints of rose petals. It is very delicate and finesseful with subtle hints of rose petals and strawberry with a faint citrus tinge. The wine is delicious now, but there is no hurry. It will drink beautifully and evolve over the next 5-10 years – Outstanding.

Atherton Wine Imports in San Jose, CA imports Joseph Roty wines including most of these rosés which they are currently selling. The retail prices are around $24 per bottle. Atherton Wine Imports is the only importer I know that has old rosés for sale. Bravo! This is something that hopefully others will follow.

If you can’t find any old rosés for sale buy some of the 2015s that are on the market and lay them away for future drinking. Marsannay, Sancerre, Bandol, and Tavel are among the rosés that are very age worthy. And, if you wait for the close out deals at the end of the 2015 rosé marketing campaign, so much the better!

In Vino Veritas,

John Tilson

This article was originally published on July 30, 2016 by The Underground Wineletter.


Best Practices: Bloody Marys Require Restraint

“The Bloody Mary is the most inconsistently made cocktail,” Alejandro Javier Lopez, founder and president of Toma Craft Cocktail Mixers, says. While classics like the Old Fashioned have prescribed processes, Bloody Marys are a moving target.

Order one at a bar or restaurant, and it might be served with a celery stick, pickled shrimp, or skewered slider. “Some bartenders and civilians apply lip-numbing spice mixes to the rim of the glass,” Rosie Schaap writes in The New York Times.

The cocktail within could be fiery or flavorless. Cautious bartenders might deliberately under-season for fear of alienating guests with lower spice thresholds.

Everyone Who Loves Negronis Needs These Glasses

Here are six dos and don’ts for making reliably excellent Bloody Marys.

What to Do When Making Bloody Marys

1. Layer Your Flavors.

The general Bloody Mary rubric is base spirit plus tomato juice, followed by salt for flavor, citrus and/or horseradish for bite, spice for heat, and umami by way of Worcestershire sauce (or, say, bacon strip). You can make one perfectly suited to your tastes by understanding how all the different components complement one another, and layering each with care. Restraint is the name of the game here.

Salt is arguably your most important component. It tempers the sweetness of tomato juice and complements all other flavors. Instead of salting the cocktail’s rim, though, embrace flavorful, salty ingredients in the glass.

Possibilities include Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, beef bouillon, or fish sauce, all of which also “lend some beautiful umami to your mix,” Jonathan Shock, bar manager of Detroit’s Lady of the House, says. (Of course, those last two are not applicable for vegetarian drinkers.)

“Make sure you add a little brine,” Ashtin Berry, matriarch, The Cook’s Club, New Orleans, says. Pickle brine has a vegetal salinity that plays well off citrus and horseradish, two components that bring brightness and buoyancy to an otherwise heavy drink. If you taste your Bloody Mary and are reminded of Campbell’s soup, try adding a squeeze of lemon or tiny pinch of grated horseradish.

Spice can also brighten your Bloody, though remember that it’s much easier to add than take away.

“Paprika, cayenne, and/or a good hot sauce are a great way to bring the appropriate kick you want,” Shock says. “But if making for a group, just remember that not everyone may have the same spice tolerance as you do.”

2. Grate Fresh Horseradish.

Jarred or prepared horseradish contains additives like vinegar, salt, oil, and preservatives, which will throw off the taste of your finished drink. Fresh horseradish, on the other hand, can be added in small doses with varying intensity. It brings bright, zesty notes to offset the sweet viscosity of tomato juice. Use it sparingly, though — horseradish will continue to intensify in flavor after it sits in the mix, Shock says.

Is it a tiny bit annoying to get out your box grater when you’re just trying to fix a drink? Sure. But the effort is on par with trimming celery, and the end absolutely justifies the means.

3. Taste as You Go.

“Real talk, do not just sit everything in a glass and expect it to taste good,” Berry says. Build your drink in a mixing glass, and sample it every step of the way to balance all its bold flavors.

You can do this with a short straw, like many bartenders do — simply quarter your favorite disposable straw, take a tiny sip, and save the other segments for future cocktail experiments.

4. It’s O.K. to Use a Pre-Made Mix.

There’s no shame in using a bottled mix, according to Shock. “If you have a favorite mix that you like, that will be the easiest way to replicate your best Bloody on a consistent basis,” he says.

The challenge is finding one you like. When VinePair blind-tasted several packaged varieties, our favorites were not necessarily the ones with the coolest branding. Avoid buyer’s remorse by looking at ingredients. If a prepackaged mix lists dill, and you’ve always hated dill-flecked potato salad, choose another bottle. And if you taste a Bloody you like at a bar or restaurant, politely ask your bartender if they used a mix. Many reputable establishments do.

What to Avoid When Making Bloody Marys

1. You Are Not Limited to Vodka.

“Don’t be afraid to play around with your base spirits,” Shock says. “You might stumble into something amazing.” While the classic Bloody Mary recipe calls for vodka, this, like almost every other component, is modifiable.

Gin is Shock’s “go to” for Bloody Marys, but he likes tequila and aquavit as well. Berry prefers Bloody Marias, or those made with tequila, for their complexity.

2. Don’t Overdo Your Garnish.

Take it easy on over-the-top Bloody Mary garnishes. Miniature cheeseburgers or fried oysters and the like may be eye-catching, but they do nothing to complement the drink itself — in most cases, they simply detract from what’s in the glass.

Pickles or olives work, and “a celery stick is always a perfect pairing,” Shock says. Be confident enough to keep it simple. Sunday mornings are tough enough.


Best Practices: Bloody Marys Require Restraint

“The Bloody Mary is the most inconsistently made cocktail,” Alejandro Javier Lopez, founder and president of Toma Craft Cocktail Mixers, says. While classics like the Old Fashioned have prescribed processes, Bloody Marys are a moving target.

Order one at a bar or restaurant, and it might be served with a celery stick, pickled shrimp, or skewered slider. “Some bartenders and civilians apply lip-numbing spice mixes to the rim of the glass,” Rosie Schaap writes in The New York Times.

The cocktail within could be fiery or flavorless. Cautious bartenders might deliberately under-season for fear of alienating guests with lower spice thresholds.

Everyone Who Loves Negronis Needs These Glasses

Here are six dos and don’ts for making reliably excellent Bloody Marys.

What to Do When Making Bloody Marys

1. Layer Your Flavors.

The general Bloody Mary rubric is base spirit plus tomato juice, followed by salt for flavor, citrus and/or horseradish for bite, spice for heat, and umami by way of Worcestershire sauce (or, say, bacon strip). You can make one perfectly suited to your tastes by understanding how all the different components complement one another, and layering each with care. Restraint is the name of the game here.

Salt is arguably your most important component. It tempers the sweetness of tomato juice and complements all other flavors. Instead of salting the cocktail’s rim, though, embrace flavorful, salty ingredients in the glass.

Possibilities include Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, beef bouillon, or fish sauce, all of which also “lend some beautiful umami to your mix,” Jonathan Shock, bar manager of Detroit’s Lady of the House, says. (Of course, those last two are not applicable for vegetarian drinkers.)

“Make sure you add a little brine,” Ashtin Berry, matriarch, The Cook’s Club, New Orleans, says. Pickle brine has a vegetal salinity that plays well off citrus and horseradish, two components that bring brightness and buoyancy to an otherwise heavy drink. If you taste your Bloody Mary and are reminded of Campbell’s soup, try adding a squeeze of lemon or tiny pinch of grated horseradish.

Spice can also brighten your Bloody, though remember that it’s much easier to add than take away.

“Paprika, cayenne, and/or a good hot sauce are a great way to bring the appropriate kick you want,” Shock says. “But if making for a group, just remember that not everyone may have the same spice tolerance as you do.”

2. Grate Fresh Horseradish.

Jarred or prepared horseradish contains additives like vinegar, salt, oil, and preservatives, which will throw off the taste of your finished drink. Fresh horseradish, on the other hand, can be added in small doses with varying intensity. It brings bright, zesty notes to offset the sweet viscosity of tomato juice. Use it sparingly, though — horseradish will continue to intensify in flavor after it sits in the mix, Shock says.

Is it a tiny bit annoying to get out your box grater when you’re just trying to fix a drink? Sure. But the effort is on par with trimming celery, and the end absolutely justifies the means.

3. Taste as You Go.

“Real talk, do not just sit everything in a glass and expect it to taste good,” Berry says. Build your drink in a mixing glass, and sample it every step of the way to balance all its bold flavors.

You can do this with a short straw, like many bartenders do — simply quarter your favorite disposable straw, take a tiny sip, and save the other segments for future cocktail experiments.

4. It’s O.K. to Use a Pre-Made Mix.

There’s no shame in using a bottled mix, according to Shock. “If you have a favorite mix that you like, that will be the easiest way to replicate your best Bloody on a consistent basis,” he says.

The challenge is finding one you like. When VinePair blind-tasted several packaged varieties, our favorites were not necessarily the ones with the coolest branding. Avoid buyer’s remorse by looking at ingredients. If a prepackaged mix lists dill, and you’ve always hated dill-flecked potato salad, choose another bottle. And if you taste a Bloody you like at a bar or restaurant, politely ask your bartender if they used a mix. Many reputable establishments do.

What to Avoid When Making Bloody Marys

1. You Are Not Limited to Vodka.

“Don’t be afraid to play around with your base spirits,” Shock says. “You might stumble into something amazing.” While the classic Bloody Mary recipe calls for vodka, this, like almost every other component, is modifiable.

Gin is Shock’s “go to” for Bloody Marys, but he likes tequila and aquavit as well. Berry prefers Bloody Marias, or those made with tequila, for their complexity.

2. Don’t Overdo Your Garnish.

Take it easy on over-the-top Bloody Mary garnishes. Miniature cheeseburgers or fried oysters and the like may be eye-catching, but they do nothing to complement the drink itself — in most cases, they simply detract from what’s in the glass.

Pickles or olives work, and “a celery stick is always a perfect pairing,” Shock says. Be confident enough to keep it simple. Sunday mornings are tough enough.


Best Practices: Bloody Marys Require Restraint

“The Bloody Mary is the most inconsistently made cocktail,” Alejandro Javier Lopez, founder and president of Toma Craft Cocktail Mixers, says. While classics like the Old Fashioned have prescribed processes, Bloody Marys are a moving target.

Order one at a bar or restaurant, and it might be served with a celery stick, pickled shrimp, or skewered slider. “Some bartenders and civilians apply lip-numbing spice mixes to the rim of the glass,” Rosie Schaap writes in The New York Times.

The cocktail within could be fiery or flavorless. Cautious bartenders might deliberately under-season for fear of alienating guests with lower spice thresholds.

Everyone Who Loves Negronis Needs These Glasses

Here are six dos and don’ts for making reliably excellent Bloody Marys.

What to Do When Making Bloody Marys

1. Layer Your Flavors.

The general Bloody Mary rubric is base spirit plus tomato juice, followed by salt for flavor, citrus and/or horseradish for bite, spice for heat, and umami by way of Worcestershire sauce (or, say, bacon strip). You can make one perfectly suited to your tastes by understanding how all the different components complement one another, and layering each with care. Restraint is the name of the game here.

Salt is arguably your most important component. It tempers the sweetness of tomato juice and complements all other flavors. Instead of salting the cocktail’s rim, though, embrace flavorful, salty ingredients in the glass.

Possibilities include Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, beef bouillon, or fish sauce, all of which also “lend some beautiful umami to your mix,” Jonathan Shock, bar manager of Detroit’s Lady of the House, says. (Of course, those last two are not applicable for vegetarian drinkers.)

“Make sure you add a little brine,” Ashtin Berry, matriarch, The Cook’s Club, New Orleans, says. Pickle brine has a vegetal salinity that plays well off citrus and horseradish, two components that bring brightness and buoyancy to an otherwise heavy drink. If you taste your Bloody Mary and are reminded of Campbell’s soup, try adding a squeeze of lemon or tiny pinch of grated horseradish.

Spice can also brighten your Bloody, though remember that it’s much easier to add than take away.

“Paprika, cayenne, and/or a good hot sauce are a great way to bring the appropriate kick you want,” Shock says. “But if making for a group, just remember that not everyone may have the same spice tolerance as you do.”

2. Grate Fresh Horseradish.

Jarred or prepared horseradish contains additives like vinegar, salt, oil, and preservatives, which will throw off the taste of your finished drink. Fresh horseradish, on the other hand, can be added in small doses with varying intensity. It brings bright, zesty notes to offset the sweet viscosity of tomato juice. Use it sparingly, though — horseradish will continue to intensify in flavor after it sits in the mix, Shock says.

Is it a tiny bit annoying to get out your box grater when you’re just trying to fix a drink? Sure. But the effort is on par with trimming celery, and the end absolutely justifies the means.

3. Taste as You Go.

“Real talk, do not just sit everything in a glass and expect it to taste good,” Berry says. Build your drink in a mixing glass, and sample it every step of the way to balance all its bold flavors.

You can do this with a short straw, like many bartenders do — simply quarter your favorite disposable straw, take a tiny sip, and save the other segments for future cocktail experiments.

4. It’s O.K. to Use a Pre-Made Mix.

There’s no shame in using a bottled mix, according to Shock. “If you have a favorite mix that you like, that will be the easiest way to replicate your best Bloody on a consistent basis,” he says.

The challenge is finding one you like. When VinePair blind-tasted several packaged varieties, our favorites were not necessarily the ones with the coolest branding. Avoid buyer’s remorse by looking at ingredients. If a prepackaged mix lists dill, and you’ve always hated dill-flecked potato salad, choose another bottle. And if you taste a Bloody you like at a bar or restaurant, politely ask your bartender if they used a mix. Many reputable establishments do.

What to Avoid When Making Bloody Marys

1. You Are Not Limited to Vodka.

“Don’t be afraid to play around with your base spirits,” Shock says. “You might stumble into something amazing.” While the classic Bloody Mary recipe calls for vodka, this, like almost every other component, is modifiable.

Gin is Shock’s “go to” for Bloody Marys, but he likes tequila and aquavit as well. Berry prefers Bloody Marias, or those made with tequila, for their complexity.

2. Don’t Overdo Your Garnish.

Take it easy on over-the-top Bloody Mary garnishes. Miniature cheeseburgers or fried oysters and the like may be eye-catching, but they do nothing to complement the drink itself — in most cases, they simply detract from what’s in the glass.

Pickles or olives work, and “a celery stick is always a perfect pairing,” Shock says. Be confident enough to keep it simple. Sunday mornings are tough enough.


Best Practices: Bloody Marys Require Restraint

“The Bloody Mary is the most inconsistently made cocktail,” Alejandro Javier Lopez, founder and president of Toma Craft Cocktail Mixers, says. While classics like the Old Fashioned have prescribed processes, Bloody Marys are a moving target.

Order one at a bar or restaurant, and it might be served with a celery stick, pickled shrimp, or skewered slider. “Some bartenders and civilians apply lip-numbing spice mixes to the rim of the glass,” Rosie Schaap writes in The New York Times.

The cocktail within could be fiery or flavorless. Cautious bartenders might deliberately under-season for fear of alienating guests with lower spice thresholds.

Everyone Who Loves Negronis Needs These Glasses

Here are six dos and don’ts for making reliably excellent Bloody Marys.

What to Do When Making Bloody Marys

1. Layer Your Flavors.

The general Bloody Mary rubric is base spirit plus tomato juice, followed by salt for flavor, citrus and/or horseradish for bite, spice for heat, and umami by way of Worcestershire sauce (or, say, bacon strip). You can make one perfectly suited to your tastes by understanding how all the different components complement one another, and layering each with care. Restraint is the name of the game here.

Salt is arguably your most important component. It tempers the sweetness of tomato juice and complements all other flavors. Instead of salting the cocktail’s rim, though, embrace flavorful, salty ingredients in the glass.

Possibilities include Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, beef bouillon, or fish sauce, all of which also “lend some beautiful umami to your mix,” Jonathan Shock, bar manager of Detroit’s Lady of the House, says. (Of course, those last two are not applicable for vegetarian drinkers.)

“Make sure you add a little brine,” Ashtin Berry, matriarch, The Cook’s Club, New Orleans, says. Pickle brine has a vegetal salinity that plays well off citrus and horseradish, two components that bring brightness and buoyancy to an otherwise heavy drink. If you taste your Bloody Mary and are reminded of Campbell’s soup, try adding a squeeze of lemon or tiny pinch of grated horseradish.

Spice can also brighten your Bloody, though remember that it’s much easier to add than take away.

“Paprika, cayenne, and/or a good hot sauce are a great way to bring the appropriate kick you want,” Shock says. “But if making for a group, just remember that not everyone may have the same spice tolerance as you do.”

2. Grate Fresh Horseradish.

Jarred or prepared horseradish contains additives like vinegar, salt, oil, and preservatives, which will throw off the taste of your finished drink. Fresh horseradish, on the other hand, can be added in small doses with varying intensity. It brings bright, zesty notes to offset the sweet viscosity of tomato juice. Use it sparingly, though — horseradish will continue to intensify in flavor after it sits in the mix, Shock says.

Is it a tiny bit annoying to get out your box grater when you’re just trying to fix a drink? Sure. But the effort is on par with trimming celery, and the end absolutely justifies the means.

3. Taste as You Go.

“Real talk, do not just sit everything in a glass and expect it to taste good,” Berry says. Build your drink in a mixing glass, and sample it every step of the way to balance all its bold flavors.

You can do this with a short straw, like many bartenders do — simply quarter your favorite disposable straw, take a tiny sip, and save the other segments for future cocktail experiments.

4. It’s O.K. to Use a Pre-Made Mix.

There’s no shame in using a bottled mix, according to Shock. “If you have a favorite mix that you like, that will be the easiest way to replicate your best Bloody on a consistent basis,” he says.

The challenge is finding one you like. When VinePair blind-tasted several packaged varieties, our favorites were not necessarily the ones with the coolest branding. Avoid buyer’s remorse by looking at ingredients. If a prepackaged mix lists dill, and you’ve always hated dill-flecked potato salad, choose another bottle. And if you taste a Bloody you like at a bar or restaurant, politely ask your bartender if they used a mix. Many reputable establishments do.

What to Avoid When Making Bloody Marys

1. You Are Not Limited to Vodka.

“Don’t be afraid to play around with your base spirits,” Shock says. “You might stumble into something amazing.” While the classic Bloody Mary recipe calls for vodka, this, like almost every other component, is modifiable.

Gin is Shock’s “go to” for Bloody Marys, but he likes tequila and aquavit as well. Berry prefers Bloody Marias, or those made with tequila, for their complexity.

2. Don’t Overdo Your Garnish.

Take it easy on over-the-top Bloody Mary garnishes. Miniature cheeseburgers or fried oysters and the like may be eye-catching, but they do nothing to complement the drink itself — in most cases, they simply detract from what’s in the glass.

Pickles or olives work, and “a celery stick is always a perfect pairing,” Shock says. Be confident enough to keep it simple. Sunday mornings are tough enough.


Best Practices: Bloody Marys Require Restraint

“The Bloody Mary is the most inconsistently made cocktail,” Alejandro Javier Lopez, founder and president of Toma Craft Cocktail Mixers, says. While classics like the Old Fashioned have prescribed processes, Bloody Marys are a moving target.

Order one at a bar or restaurant, and it might be served with a celery stick, pickled shrimp, or skewered slider. “Some bartenders and civilians apply lip-numbing spice mixes to the rim of the glass,” Rosie Schaap writes in The New York Times.

The cocktail within could be fiery or flavorless. Cautious bartenders might deliberately under-season for fear of alienating guests with lower spice thresholds.

Everyone Who Loves Negronis Needs These Glasses

Here are six dos and don’ts for making reliably excellent Bloody Marys.

What to Do When Making Bloody Marys

1. Layer Your Flavors.

The general Bloody Mary rubric is base spirit plus tomato juice, followed by salt for flavor, citrus and/or horseradish for bite, spice for heat, and umami by way of Worcestershire sauce (or, say, bacon strip). You can make one perfectly suited to your tastes by understanding how all the different components complement one another, and layering each with care. Restraint is the name of the game here.

Salt is arguably your most important component. It tempers the sweetness of tomato juice and complements all other flavors. Instead of salting the cocktail’s rim, though, embrace flavorful, salty ingredients in the glass.

Possibilities include Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, beef bouillon, or fish sauce, all of which also “lend some beautiful umami to your mix,” Jonathan Shock, bar manager of Detroit’s Lady of the House, says. (Of course, those last two are not applicable for vegetarian drinkers.)

“Make sure you add a little brine,” Ashtin Berry, matriarch, The Cook’s Club, New Orleans, says. Pickle brine has a vegetal salinity that plays well off citrus and horseradish, two components that bring brightness and buoyancy to an otherwise heavy drink. If you taste your Bloody Mary and are reminded of Campbell’s soup, try adding a squeeze of lemon or tiny pinch of grated horseradish.

Spice can also brighten your Bloody, though remember that it’s much easier to add than take away.

“Paprika, cayenne, and/or a good hot sauce are a great way to bring the appropriate kick you want,” Shock says. “But if making for a group, just remember that not everyone may have the same spice tolerance as you do.”

2. Grate Fresh Horseradish.

Jarred or prepared horseradish contains additives like vinegar, salt, oil, and preservatives, which will throw off the taste of your finished drink. Fresh horseradish, on the other hand, can be added in small doses with varying intensity. It brings bright, zesty notes to offset the sweet viscosity of tomato juice. Use it sparingly, though — horseradish will continue to intensify in flavor after it sits in the mix, Shock says.

Is it a tiny bit annoying to get out your box grater when you’re just trying to fix a drink? Sure. But the effort is on par with trimming celery, and the end absolutely justifies the means.

3. Taste as You Go.

“Real talk, do not just sit everything in a glass and expect it to taste good,” Berry says. Build your drink in a mixing glass, and sample it every step of the way to balance all its bold flavors.

You can do this with a short straw, like many bartenders do — simply quarter your favorite disposable straw, take a tiny sip, and save the other segments for future cocktail experiments.

4. It’s O.K. to Use a Pre-Made Mix.

There’s no shame in using a bottled mix, according to Shock. “If you have a favorite mix that you like, that will be the easiest way to replicate your best Bloody on a consistent basis,” he says.

The challenge is finding one you like. When VinePair blind-tasted several packaged varieties, our favorites were not necessarily the ones with the coolest branding. Avoid buyer’s remorse by looking at ingredients. If a prepackaged mix lists dill, and you’ve always hated dill-flecked potato salad, choose another bottle. And if you taste a Bloody you like at a bar or restaurant, politely ask your bartender if they used a mix. Many reputable establishments do.

What to Avoid When Making Bloody Marys

1. You Are Not Limited to Vodka.

“Don’t be afraid to play around with your base spirits,” Shock says. “You might stumble into something amazing.” While the classic Bloody Mary recipe calls for vodka, this, like almost every other component, is modifiable.

Gin is Shock’s “go to” for Bloody Marys, but he likes tequila and aquavit as well. Berry prefers Bloody Marias, or those made with tequila, for their complexity.

2. Don’t Overdo Your Garnish.

Take it easy on over-the-top Bloody Mary garnishes. Miniature cheeseburgers or fried oysters and the like may be eye-catching, but they do nothing to complement the drink itself — in most cases, they simply detract from what’s in the glass.

Pickles or olives work, and “a celery stick is always a perfect pairing,” Shock says. Be confident enough to keep it simple. Sunday mornings are tough enough.


Best Practices: Bloody Marys Require Restraint

“The Bloody Mary is the most inconsistently made cocktail,” Alejandro Javier Lopez, founder and president of Toma Craft Cocktail Mixers, says. While classics like the Old Fashioned have prescribed processes, Bloody Marys are a moving target.

Order one at a bar or restaurant, and it might be served with a celery stick, pickled shrimp, or skewered slider. “Some bartenders and civilians apply lip-numbing spice mixes to the rim of the glass,” Rosie Schaap writes in The New York Times.

The cocktail within could be fiery or flavorless. Cautious bartenders might deliberately under-season for fear of alienating guests with lower spice thresholds.

Everyone Who Loves Negronis Needs These Glasses

Here are six dos and don’ts for making reliably excellent Bloody Marys.

What to Do When Making Bloody Marys

1. Layer Your Flavors.

The general Bloody Mary rubric is base spirit plus tomato juice, followed by salt for flavor, citrus and/or horseradish for bite, spice for heat, and umami by way of Worcestershire sauce (or, say, bacon strip). You can make one perfectly suited to your tastes by understanding how all the different components complement one another, and layering each with care. Restraint is the name of the game here.

Salt is arguably your most important component. It tempers the sweetness of tomato juice and complements all other flavors. Instead of salting the cocktail’s rim, though, embrace flavorful, salty ingredients in the glass.

Possibilities include Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, beef bouillon, or fish sauce, all of which also “lend some beautiful umami to your mix,” Jonathan Shock, bar manager of Detroit’s Lady of the House, says. (Of course, those last two are not applicable for vegetarian drinkers.)

“Make sure you add a little brine,” Ashtin Berry, matriarch, The Cook’s Club, New Orleans, says. Pickle brine has a vegetal salinity that plays well off citrus and horseradish, two components that bring brightness and buoyancy to an otherwise heavy drink. If you taste your Bloody Mary and are reminded of Campbell’s soup, try adding a squeeze of lemon or tiny pinch of grated horseradish.

Spice can also brighten your Bloody, though remember that it’s much easier to add than take away.

“Paprika, cayenne, and/or a good hot sauce are a great way to bring the appropriate kick you want,” Shock says. “But if making for a group, just remember that not everyone may have the same spice tolerance as you do.”

2. Grate Fresh Horseradish.

Jarred or prepared horseradish contains additives like vinegar, salt, oil, and preservatives, which will throw off the taste of your finished drink. Fresh horseradish, on the other hand, can be added in small doses with varying intensity. It brings bright, zesty notes to offset the sweet viscosity of tomato juice. Use it sparingly, though — horseradish will continue to intensify in flavor after it sits in the mix, Shock says.

Is it a tiny bit annoying to get out your box grater when you’re just trying to fix a drink? Sure. But the effort is on par with trimming celery, and the end absolutely justifies the means.

3. Taste as You Go.

“Real talk, do not just sit everything in a glass and expect it to taste good,” Berry says. Build your drink in a mixing glass, and sample it every step of the way to balance all its bold flavors.

You can do this with a short straw, like many bartenders do — simply quarter your favorite disposable straw, take a tiny sip, and save the other segments for future cocktail experiments.

4. It’s O.K. to Use a Pre-Made Mix.

There’s no shame in using a bottled mix, according to Shock. “If you have a favorite mix that you like, that will be the easiest way to replicate your best Bloody on a consistent basis,” he says.

The challenge is finding one you like. When VinePair blind-tasted several packaged varieties, our favorites were not necessarily the ones with the coolest branding. Avoid buyer’s remorse by looking at ingredients. If a prepackaged mix lists dill, and you’ve always hated dill-flecked potato salad, choose another bottle. And if you taste a Bloody you like at a bar or restaurant, politely ask your bartender if they used a mix. Many reputable establishments do.

What to Avoid When Making Bloody Marys

1. You Are Not Limited to Vodka.

“Don’t be afraid to play around with your base spirits,” Shock says. “You might stumble into something amazing.” While the classic Bloody Mary recipe calls for vodka, this, like almost every other component, is modifiable.

Gin is Shock’s “go to” for Bloody Marys, but he likes tequila and aquavit as well. Berry prefers Bloody Marias, or those made with tequila, for their complexity.

2. Don’t Overdo Your Garnish.

Take it easy on over-the-top Bloody Mary garnishes. Miniature cheeseburgers or fried oysters and the like may be eye-catching, but they do nothing to complement the drink itself — in most cases, they simply detract from what’s in the glass.

Pickles or olives work, and “a celery stick is always a perfect pairing,” Shock says. Be confident enough to keep it simple. Sunday mornings are tough enough.


Best Practices: Bloody Marys Require Restraint

“The Bloody Mary is the most inconsistently made cocktail,” Alejandro Javier Lopez, founder and president of Toma Craft Cocktail Mixers, says. While classics like the Old Fashioned have prescribed processes, Bloody Marys are a moving target.

Order one at a bar or restaurant, and it might be served with a celery stick, pickled shrimp, or skewered slider. “Some bartenders and civilians apply lip-numbing spice mixes to the rim of the glass,” Rosie Schaap writes in The New York Times.

The cocktail within could be fiery or flavorless. Cautious bartenders might deliberately under-season for fear of alienating guests with lower spice thresholds.

Everyone Who Loves Negronis Needs These Glasses

Here are six dos and don’ts for making reliably excellent Bloody Marys.

What to Do When Making Bloody Marys

1. Layer Your Flavors.

The general Bloody Mary rubric is base spirit plus tomato juice, followed by salt for flavor, citrus and/or horseradish for bite, spice for heat, and umami by way of Worcestershire sauce (or, say, bacon strip). You can make one perfectly suited to your tastes by understanding how all the different components complement one another, and layering each with care. Restraint is the name of the game here.

Salt is arguably your most important component. It tempers the sweetness of tomato juice and complements all other flavors. Instead of salting the cocktail’s rim, though, embrace flavorful, salty ingredients in the glass.

Possibilities include Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, beef bouillon, or fish sauce, all of which also “lend some beautiful umami to your mix,” Jonathan Shock, bar manager of Detroit’s Lady of the House, says. (Of course, those last two are not applicable for vegetarian drinkers.)

“Make sure you add a little brine,” Ashtin Berry, matriarch, The Cook’s Club, New Orleans, says. Pickle brine has a vegetal salinity that plays well off citrus and horseradish, two components that bring brightness and buoyancy to an otherwise heavy drink. If you taste your Bloody Mary and are reminded of Campbell’s soup, try adding a squeeze of lemon or tiny pinch of grated horseradish.

Spice can also brighten your Bloody, though remember that it’s much easier to add than take away.

“Paprika, cayenne, and/or a good hot sauce are a great way to bring the appropriate kick you want,” Shock says. “But if making for a group, just remember that not everyone may have the same spice tolerance as you do.”

2. Grate Fresh Horseradish.

Jarred or prepared horseradish contains additives like vinegar, salt, oil, and preservatives, which will throw off the taste of your finished drink. Fresh horseradish, on the other hand, can be added in small doses with varying intensity. It brings bright, zesty notes to offset the sweet viscosity of tomato juice. Use it sparingly, though — horseradish will continue to intensify in flavor after it sits in the mix, Shock says.

Is it a tiny bit annoying to get out your box grater when you’re just trying to fix a drink? Sure. But the effort is on par with trimming celery, and the end absolutely justifies the means.

3. Taste as You Go.

“Real talk, do not just sit everything in a glass and expect it to taste good,” Berry says. Build your drink in a mixing glass, and sample it every step of the way to balance all its bold flavors.

You can do this with a short straw, like many bartenders do — simply quarter your favorite disposable straw, take a tiny sip, and save the other segments for future cocktail experiments.

4. It’s O.K. to Use a Pre-Made Mix.

There’s no shame in using a bottled mix, according to Shock. “If you have a favorite mix that you like, that will be the easiest way to replicate your best Bloody on a consistent basis,” he says.

The challenge is finding one you like. When VinePair blind-tasted several packaged varieties, our favorites were not necessarily the ones with the coolest branding. Avoid buyer’s remorse by looking at ingredients. If a prepackaged mix lists dill, and you’ve always hated dill-flecked potato salad, choose another bottle. And if you taste a Bloody you like at a bar or restaurant, politely ask your bartender if they used a mix. Many reputable establishments do.

What to Avoid When Making Bloody Marys

1. You Are Not Limited to Vodka.

“Don’t be afraid to play around with your base spirits,” Shock says. “You might stumble into something amazing.” While the classic Bloody Mary recipe calls for vodka, this, like almost every other component, is modifiable.

Gin is Shock’s “go to” for Bloody Marys, but he likes tequila and aquavit as well. Berry prefers Bloody Marias, or those made with tequila, for their complexity.

2. Don’t Overdo Your Garnish.

Take it easy on over-the-top Bloody Mary garnishes. Miniature cheeseburgers or fried oysters and the like may be eye-catching, but they do nothing to complement the drink itself — in most cases, they simply detract from what’s in the glass.

Pickles or olives work, and “a celery stick is always a perfect pairing,” Shock says. Be confident enough to keep it simple. Sunday mornings are tough enough.


Best Practices: Bloody Marys Require Restraint

“The Bloody Mary is the most inconsistently made cocktail,” Alejandro Javier Lopez, founder and president of Toma Craft Cocktail Mixers, says. While classics like the Old Fashioned have prescribed processes, Bloody Marys are a moving target.

Order one at a bar or restaurant, and it might be served with a celery stick, pickled shrimp, or skewered slider. “Some bartenders and civilians apply lip-numbing spice mixes to the rim of the glass,” Rosie Schaap writes in The New York Times.

The cocktail within could be fiery or flavorless. Cautious bartenders might deliberately under-season for fear of alienating guests with lower spice thresholds.

Everyone Who Loves Negronis Needs These Glasses

Here are six dos and don’ts for making reliably excellent Bloody Marys.

What to Do When Making Bloody Marys

1. Layer Your Flavors.

The general Bloody Mary rubric is base spirit plus tomato juice, followed by salt for flavor, citrus and/or horseradish for bite, spice for heat, and umami by way of Worcestershire sauce (or, say, bacon strip). You can make one perfectly suited to your tastes by understanding how all the different components complement one another, and layering each with care. Restraint is the name of the game here.

Salt is arguably your most important component. It tempers the sweetness of tomato juice and complements all other flavors. Instead of salting the cocktail’s rim, though, embrace flavorful, salty ingredients in the glass.

Possibilities include Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, beef bouillon, or fish sauce, all of which also “lend some beautiful umami to your mix,” Jonathan Shock, bar manager of Detroit’s Lady of the House, says. (Of course, those last two are not applicable for vegetarian drinkers.)

“Make sure you add a little brine,” Ashtin Berry, matriarch, The Cook’s Club, New Orleans, says. Pickle brine has a vegetal salinity that plays well off citrus and horseradish, two components that bring brightness and buoyancy to an otherwise heavy drink. If you taste your Bloody Mary and are reminded of Campbell’s soup, try adding a squeeze of lemon or tiny pinch of grated horseradish.

Spice can also brighten your Bloody, though remember that it’s much easier to add than take away.

“Paprika, cayenne, and/or a good hot sauce are a great way to bring the appropriate kick you want,” Shock says. “But if making for a group, just remember that not everyone may have the same spice tolerance as you do.”

2. Grate Fresh Horseradish.

Jarred or prepared horseradish contains additives like vinegar, salt, oil, and preservatives, which will throw off the taste of your finished drink. Fresh horseradish, on the other hand, can be added in small doses with varying intensity. It brings bright, zesty notes to offset the sweet viscosity of tomato juice. Use it sparingly, though — horseradish will continue to intensify in flavor after it sits in the mix, Shock says.

Is it a tiny bit annoying to get out your box grater when you’re just trying to fix a drink? Sure. But the effort is on par with trimming celery, and the end absolutely justifies the means.

3. Taste as You Go.

“Real talk, do not just sit everything in a glass and expect it to taste good,” Berry says. Build your drink in a mixing glass, and sample it every step of the way to balance all its bold flavors.

You can do this with a short straw, like many bartenders do — simply quarter your favorite disposable straw, take a tiny sip, and save the other segments for future cocktail experiments.

4. It’s O.K. to Use a Pre-Made Mix.

There’s no shame in using a bottled mix, according to Shock. “If you have a favorite mix that you like, that will be the easiest way to replicate your best Bloody on a consistent basis,” he says.

The challenge is finding one you like. When VinePair blind-tasted several packaged varieties, our favorites were not necessarily the ones with the coolest branding. Avoid buyer’s remorse by looking at ingredients. If a prepackaged mix lists dill, and you’ve always hated dill-flecked potato salad, choose another bottle. And if you taste a Bloody you like at a bar or restaurant, politely ask your bartender if they used a mix. Many reputable establishments do.

What to Avoid When Making Bloody Marys

1. You Are Not Limited to Vodka.

“Don’t be afraid to play around with your base spirits,” Shock says. “You might stumble into something amazing.” While the classic Bloody Mary recipe calls for vodka, this, like almost every other component, is modifiable.

Gin is Shock’s “go to” for Bloody Marys, but he likes tequila and aquavit as well. Berry prefers Bloody Marias, or those made with tequila, for their complexity.

2. Don’t Overdo Your Garnish.

Take it easy on over-the-top Bloody Mary garnishes. Miniature cheeseburgers or fried oysters and the like may be eye-catching, but they do nothing to complement the drink itself — in most cases, they simply detract from what’s in the glass.

Pickles or olives work, and “a celery stick is always a perfect pairing,” Shock says. Be confident enough to keep it simple. Sunday mornings are tough enough.


Best Practices: Bloody Marys Require Restraint

“The Bloody Mary is the most inconsistently made cocktail,” Alejandro Javier Lopez, founder and president of Toma Craft Cocktail Mixers, says. While classics like the Old Fashioned have prescribed processes, Bloody Marys are a moving target.

Order one at a bar or restaurant, and it might be served with a celery stick, pickled shrimp, or skewered slider. “Some bartenders and civilians apply lip-numbing spice mixes to the rim of the glass,” Rosie Schaap writes in The New York Times.

The cocktail within could be fiery or flavorless. Cautious bartenders might deliberately under-season for fear of alienating guests with lower spice thresholds.

Everyone Who Loves Negronis Needs These Glasses

Here are six dos and don’ts for making reliably excellent Bloody Marys.

What to Do When Making Bloody Marys

1. Layer Your Flavors.

The general Bloody Mary rubric is base spirit plus tomato juice, followed by salt for flavor, citrus and/or horseradish for bite, spice for heat, and umami by way of Worcestershire sauce (or, say, bacon strip). You can make one perfectly suited to your tastes by understanding how all the different components complement one another, and layering each with care. Restraint is the name of the game here.

Salt is arguably your most important component. It tempers the sweetness of tomato juice and complements all other flavors. Instead of salting the cocktail’s rim, though, embrace flavorful, salty ingredients in the glass.

Possibilities include Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, beef bouillon, or fish sauce, all of which also “lend some beautiful umami to your mix,” Jonathan Shock, bar manager of Detroit’s Lady of the House, says. (Of course, those last two are not applicable for vegetarian drinkers.)

“Make sure you add a little brine,” Ashtin Berry, matriarch, The Cook’s Club, New Orleans, says. Pickle brine has a vegetal salinity that plays well off citrus and horseradish, two components that bring brightness and buoyancy to an otherwise heavy drink. If you taste your Bloody Mary and are reminded of Campbell’s soup, try adding a squeeze of lemon or tiny pinch of grated horseradish.

Spice can also brighten your Bloody, though remember that it’s much easier to add than take away.

“Paprika, cayenne, and/or a good hot sauce are a great way to bring the appropriate kick you want,” Shock says. “But if making for a group, just remember that not everyone may have the same spice tolerance as you do.”

2. Grate Fresh Horseradish.

Jarred or prepared horseradish contains additives like vinegar, salt, oil, and preservatives, which will throw off the taste of your finished drink. Fresh horseradish, on the other hand, can be added in small doses with varying intensity. It brings bright, zesty notes to offset the sweet viscosity of tomato juice. Use it sparingly, though — horseradish will continue to intensify in flavor after it sits in the mix, Shock says.

Is it a tiny bit annoying to get out your box grater when you’re just trying to fix a drink? Sure. But the effort is on par with trimming celery, and the end absolutely justifies the means.

3. Taste as You Go.

“Real talk, do not just sit everything in a glass and expect it to taste good,” Berry says. Build your drink in a mixing glass, and sample it every step of the way to balance all its bold flavors.

You can do this with a short straw, like many bartenders do — simply quarter your favorite disposable straw, take a tiny sip, and save the other segments for future cocktail experiments.

4. It’s O.K. to Use a Pre-Made Mix.

There’s no shame in using a bottled mix, according to Shock. “If you have a favorite mix that you like, that will be the easiest way to replicate your best Bloody on a consistent basis,” he says.

The challenge is finding one you like. When VinePair blind-tasted several packaged varieties, our favorites were not necessarily the ones with the coolest branding. Avoid buyer’s remorse by looking at ingredients. If a prepackaged mix lists dill, and you’ve always hated dill-flecked potato salad, choose another bottle. And if you taste a Bloody you like at a bar or restaurant, politely ask your bartender if they used a mix. Many reputable establishments do.

What to Avoid When Making Bloody Marys

1. You Are Not Limited to Vodka.

“Don’t be afraid to play around with your base spirits,” Shock says. “You might stumble into something amazing.” While the classic Bloody Mary recipe calls for vodka, this, like almost every other component, is modifiable.

Gin is Shock’s “go to” for Bloody Marys, but he likes tequila and aquavit as well. Berry prefers Bloody Marias, or those made with tequila, for their complexity.

2. Don’t Overdo Your Garnish.

Take it easy on over-the-top Bloody Mary garnishes. Miniature cheeseburgers or fried oysters and the like may be eye-catching, but they do nothing to complement the drink itself — in most cases, they simply detract from what’s in the glass.

Pickles or olives work, and “a celery stick is always a perfect pairing,” Shock says. Be confident enough to keep it simple. Sunday mornings are tough enough.


Best Practices: Bloody Marys Require Restraint

“The Bloody Mary is the most inconsistently made cocktail,” Alejandro Javier Lopez, founder and president of Toma Craft Cocktail Mixers, says. While classics like the Old Fashioned have prescribed processes, Bloody Marys are a moving target.

Order one at a bar or restaurant, and it might be served with a celery stick, pickled shrimp, or skewered slider. “Some bartenders and civilians apply lip-numbing spice mixes to the rim of the glass,” Rosie Schaap writes in The New York Times.

The cocktail within could be fiery or flavorless. Cautious bartenders might deliberately under-season for fear of alienating guests with lower spice thresholds.

Everyone Who Loves Negronis Needs These Glasses

Here are six dos and don’ts for making reliably excellent Bloody Marys.

What to Do When Making Bloody Marys

1. Layer Your Flavors.

The general Bloody Mary rubric is base spirit plus tomato juice, followed by salt for flavor, citrus and/or horseradish for bite, spice for heat, and umami by way of Worcestershire sauce (or, say, bacon strip). You can make one perfectly suited to your tastes by understanding how all the different components complement one another, and layering each with care. Restraint is the name of the game here.

Salt is arguably your most important component. It tempers the sweetness of tomato juice and complements all other flavors. Instead of salting the cocktail’s rim, though, embrace flavorful, salty ingredients in the glass.

Possibilities include Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, beef bouillon, or fish sauce, all of which also “lend some beautiful umami to your mix,” Jonathan Shock, bar manager of Detroit’s Lady of the House, says. (Of course, those last two are not applicable for vegetarian drinkers.)

“Make sure you add a little brine,” Ashtin Berry, matriarch, The Cook’s Club, New Orleans, says. Pickle brine has a vegetal salinity that plays well off citrus and horseradish, two components that bring brightness and buoyancy to an otherwise heavy drink. If you taste your Bloody Mary and are reminded of Campbell’s soup, try adding a squeeze of lemon or tiny pinch of grated horseradish.

Spice can also brighten your Bloody, though remember that it’s much easier to add than take away.

“Paprika, cayenne, and/or a good hot sauce are a great way to bring the appropriate kick you want,” Shock says. “But if making for a group, just remember that not everyone may have the same spice tolerance as you do.”

2. Grate Fresh Horseradish.

Jarred or prepared horseradish contains additives like vinegar, salt, oil, and preservatives, which will throw off the taste of your finished drink. Fresh horseradish, on the other hand, can be added in small doses with varying intensity. It brings bright, zesty notes to offset the sweet viscosity of tomato juice. Use it sparingly, though — horseradish will continue to intensify in flavor after it sits in the mix, Shock says.

Is it a tiny bit annoying to get out your box grater when you’re just trying to fix a drink? Sure. But the effort is on par with trimming celery, and the end absolutely justifies the means.

3. Taste as You Go.

“Real talk, do not just sit everything in a glass and expect it to taste good,” Berry says. Build your drink in a mixing glass, and sample it every step of the way to balance all its bold flavors.

You can do this with a short straw, like many bartenders do — simply quarter your favorite disposable straw, take a tiny sip, and save the other segments for future cocktail experiments.

4. It’s O.K. to Use a Pre-Made Mix.

There’s no shame in using a bottled mix, according to Shock. “If you have a favorite mix that you like, that will be the easiest way to replicate your best Bloody on a consistent basis,” he says.

The challenge is finding one you like. When VinePair blind-tasted several packaged varieties, our favorites were not necessarily the ones with the coolest branding. Avoid buyer’s remorse by looking at ingredients. If a prepackaged mix lists dill, and you’ve always hated dill-flecked potato salad, choose another bottle. And if you taste a Bloody you like at a bar or restaurant, politely ask your bartender if they used a mix. Many reputable establishments do.

What to Avoid When Making Bloody Marys

1. You Are Not Limited to Vodka.

“Don’t be afraid to play around with your base spirits,” Shock says. “You might stumble into something amazing.” While the classic Bloody Mary recipe calls for vodka, this, like almost every other component, is modifiable.

Gin is Shock’s “go to” for Bloody Marys, but he likes tequila and aquavit as well. Berry prefers Bloody Marias, or those made with tequila, for their complexity.

2. Don’t Overdo Your Garnish.

Take it easy on over-the-top Bloody Mary garnishes. Miniature cheeseburgers or fried oysters and the like may be eye-catching, but they do nothing to complement the drink itself — in most cases, they simply detract from what’s in the glass.

Pickles or olives work, and “a celery stick is always a perfect pairing,” Shock says. Be confident enough to keep it simple. Sunday mornings are tough enough.


Watch the video: Antique Garden Rose Varieties. Garden Style 102 (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Ervin

    I - this opinion.

  2. Mikasida

    I believe you were wrong. I'm sure. Let us try to discuss this.



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