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Will Eataly Expand to DC? (Updated)

Will Eataly Expand to DC? (Updated)


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The Washington Post doesn't think so

Jessica Chou

Joe Bastianich and Mario Batali brought up Eataly's expansion earlier this summer, but the megastore hasn't found a location, making an early 2012 opening doubtful.

Eataly reportedly has yet to sign a lease, causing concerns in the community. "As I understand it, they’re not coming," said one broker in an interview with the Washington Post.

Part of the problem is the size. New York's Eataly is about 40,000 square feet, and Batali says he doesn't plan to downsize in the capital.

"I don’t want to do it smaller. Smaller? That’s like a little outpost. It’s like a remainder store," Batali said.

Update: It looks like the expansion isn't happening for a while.

"We are not seeking out new locations," Eataly partner Nicola Farinetti told us. "For us, the space is fundamental. If we fall in love with a space, we will be quick to open. So, it's possible, but not definite."

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


Like Slow Streets, Streateries, or car-free Beach Drive? DC Council wants to hear about it.

A public roundtable on March 23 will focus on the creative transportation solutions DC has implemented during the pandemic, and whether they should carry on after it ends.

The roundtable will be hosted by Councilmember Mary Cheh, who is chair of the Committee on Transportation and the Environment. According to the public hearing notice, it will focus on:

  • Streateries
  • Bus-only lanes
  • Slow Streets
  • And whether the National Park Service should permanently close Beach Drive in Rock Creek Park to cars.

Cheh’s director of communications, Kelly Whittier, said the conversation has the potential to touch on bike lane infrastructure as well.

As COVID-19 made indoor gathering and crowds dangerous, DC officials turned their attention to creating more outdoor public space for residents to walk, ride bicycles, and dine while maintaining social distancing.

Special permits, valid only during DC’s State of Emergency, have allowed restaurants to expand outdoor space for dining, and have allowed for the creation of streateries and dining plazas.

Meanwhile, “Slow Streets” have popped up all over the District (to mixed results). And thousands of pedestrians and bicyclists took advantage of car-free Beach Drive after the National Park Service closed it to vehicles in order to create more space to traverse Rock Creek Park (parts of it are still closed to vehicles).

A slow street on S St NW near Connecticut Ave. Image by angela n. licensed under Creative Commons.

So far, most of these changes are just temporary, made to last until the State of Emergency is lifted. But taking space from vehicles and making it available to people could have benefits after the pandemic, and advocates for active transportation and public space have been asking for initiatives like this for years. District Department of Transportation officials have said that they are considering keeping some of them after the pandemic.

The purpose of the roundtable, according to the hearing notice, is to hear from the public and from DDOT about “what transportation initiatives that began during the pandemic should continue.”

The hearing will be held virtually on March 23 at 12 p.m. Members of the public can submit written testimony to the official record before April 6, or testify at the roundtable (contact info is in the public hearing notice).

What pandemic transportation initiatives do you want to see continue?

Continue the conversation about urbanism in the Washington region and support GGWash’s news and advocacy when you join the GGWash Neighborhood!

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the Baltimore suburbs and a writer for Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact. A Baltimore resident, Libby enjoys running and painting in her spare time.


Like Slow Streets, Streateries, or car-free Beach Drive? DC Council wants to hear about it.

A public roundtable on March 23 will focus on the creative transportation solutions DC has implemented during the pandemic, and whether they should carry on after it ends.

The roundtable will be hosted by Councilmember Mary Cheh, who is chair of the Committee on Transportation and the Environment. According to the public hearing notice, it will focus on:

  • Streateries
  • Bus-only lanes
  • Slow Streets
  • And whether the National Park Service should permanently close Beach Drive in Rock Creek Park to cars.

Cheh’s director of communications, Kelly Whittier, said the conversation has the potential to touch on bike lane infrastructure as well.

As COVID-19 made indoor gathering and crowds dangerous, DC officials turned their attention to creating more outdoor public space for residents to walk, ride bicycles, and dine while maintaining social distancing.

Special permits, valid only during DC’s State of Emergency, have allowed restaurants to expand outdoor space for dining, and have allowed for the creation of streateries and dining plazas.

Meanwhile, “Slow Streets” have popped up all over the District (to mixed results). And thousands of pedestrians and bicyclists took advantage of car-free Beach Drive after the National Park Service closed it to vehicles in order to create more space to traverse Rock Creek Park (parts of it are still closed to vehicles).

A slow street on S St NW near Connecticut Ave. Image by angela n. licensed under Creative Commons.

So far, most of these changes are just temporary, made to last until the State of Emergency is lifted. But taking space from vehicles and making it available to people could have benefits after the pandemic, and advocates for active transportation and public space have been asking for initiatives like this for years. District Department of Transportation officials have said that they are considering keeping some of them after the pandemic.

The purpose of the roundtable, according to the hearing notice, is to hear from the public and from DDOT about “what transportation initiatives that began during the pandemic should continue.”

The hearing will be held virtually on March 23 at 12 p.m. Members of the public can submit written testimony to the official record before April 6, or testify at the roundtable (contact info is in the public hearing notice).

What pandemic transportation initiatives do you want to see continue?

Continue the conversation about urbanism in the Washington region and support GGWash’s news and advocacy when you join the GGWash Neighborhood!

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the Baltimore suburbs and a writer for Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact. A Baltimore resident, Libby enjoys running and painting in her spare time.


Like Slow Streets, Streateries, or car-free Beach Drive? DC Council wants to hear about it.

A public roundtable on March 23 will focus on the creative transportation solutions DC has implemented during the pandemic, and whether they should carry on after it ends.

The roundtable will be hosted by Councilmember Mary Cheh, who is chair of the Committee on Transportation and the Environment. According to the public hearing notice, it will focus on:

  • Streateries
  • Bus-only lanes
  • Slow Streets
  • And whether the National Park Service should permanently close Beach Drive in Rock Creek Park to cars.

Cheh’s director of communications, Kelly Whittier, said the conversation has the potential to touch on bike lane infrastructure as well.

As COVID-19 made indoor gathering and crowds dangerous, DC officials turned their attention to creating more outdoor public space for residents to walk, ride bicycles, and dine while maintaining social distancing.

Special permits, valid only during DC’s State of Emergency, have allowed restaurants to expand outdoor space for dining, and have allowed for the creation of streateries and dining plazas.

Meanwhile, “Slow Streets” have popped up all over the District (to mixed results). And thousands of pedestrians and bicyclists took advantage of car-free Beach Drive after the National Park Service closed it to vehicles in order to create more space to traverse Rock Creek Park (parts of it are still closed to vehicles).

A slow street on S St NW near Connecticut Ave. Image by angela n. licensed under Creative Commons.

So far, most of these changes are just temporary, made to last until the State of Emergency is lifted. But taking space from vehicles and making it available to people could have benefits after the pandemic, and advocates for active transportation and public space have been asking for initiatives like this for years. District Department of Transportation officials have said that they are considering keeping some of them after the pandemic.

The purpose of the roundtable, according to the hearing notice, is to hear from the public and from DDOT about “what transportation initiatives that began during the pandemic should continue.”

The hearing will be held virtually on March 23 at 12 p.m. Members of the public can submit written testimony to the official record before April 6, or testify at the roundtable (contact info is in the public hearing notice).

What pandemic transportation initiatives do you want to see continue?

Continue the conversation about urbanism in the Washington region and support GGWash’s news and advocacy when you join the GGWash Neighborhood!

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the Baltimore suburbs and a writer for Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact. A Baltimore resident, Libby enjoys running and painting in her spare time.


Like Slow Streets, Streateries, or car-free Beach Drive? DC Council wants to hear about it.

A public roundtable on March 23 will focus on the creative transportation solutions DC has implemented during the pandemic, and whether they should carry on after it ends.

The roundtable will be hosted by Councilmember Mary Cheh, who is chair of the Committee on Transportation and the Environment. According to the public hearing notice, it will focus on:

  • Streateries
  • Bus-only lanes
  • Slow Streets
  • And whether the National Park Service should permanently close Beach Drive in Rock Creek Park to cars.

Cheh’s director of communications, Kelly Whittier, said the conversation has the potential to touch on bike lane infrastructure as well.

As COVID-19 made indoor gathering and crowds dangerous, DC officials turned their attention to creating more outdoor public space for residents to walk, ride bicycles, and dine while maintaining social distancing.

Special permits, valid only during DC’s State of Emergency, have allowed restaurants to expand outdoor space for dining, and have allowed for the creation of streateries and dining plazas.

Meanwhile, “Slow Streets” have popped up all over the District (to mixed results). And thousands of pedestrians and bicyclists took advantage of car-free Beach Drive after the National Park Service closed it to vehicles in order to create more space to traverse Rock Creek Park (parts of it are still closed to vehicles).

A slow street on S St NW near Connecticut Ave. Image by angela n. licensed under Creative Commons.

So far, most of these changes are just temporary, made to last until the State of Emergency is lifted. But taking space from vehicles and making it available to people could have benefits after the pandemic, and advocates for active transportation and public space have been asking for initiatives like this for years. District Department of Transportation officials have said that they are considering keeping some of them after the pandemic.

The purpose of the roundtable, according to the hearing notice, is to hear from the public and from DDOT about “what transportation initiatives that began during the pandemic should continue.”

The hearing will be held virtually on March 23 at 12 p.m. Members of the public can submit written testimony to the official record before April 6, or testify at the roundtable (contact info is in the public hearing notice).

What pandemic transportation initiatives do you want to see continue?

Continue the conversation about urbanism in the Washington region and support GGWash’s news and advocacy when you join the GGWash Neighborhood!

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the Baltimore suburbs and a writer for Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact. A Baltimore resident, Libby enjoys running and painting in her spare time.


Like Slow Streets, Streateries, or car-free Beach Drive? DC Council wants to hear about it.

A public roundtable on March 23 will focus on the creative transportation solutions DC has implemented during the pandemic, and whether they should carry on after it ends.

The roundtable will be hosted by Councilmember Mary Cheh, who is chair of the Committee on Transportation and the Environment. According to the public hearing notice, it will focus on:

  • Streateries
  • Bus-only lanes
  • Slow Streets
  • And whether the National Park Service should permanently close Beach Drive in Rock Creek Park to cars.

Cheh’s director of communications, Kelly Whittier, said the conversation has the potential to touch on bike lane infrastructure as well.

As COVID-19 made indoor gathering and crowds dangerous, DC officials turned their attention to creating more outdoor public space for residents to walk, ride bicycles, and dine while maintaining social distancing.

Special permits, valid only during DC’s State of Emergency, have allowed restaurants to expand outdoor space for dining, and have allowed for the creation of streateries and dining plazas.

Meanwhile, “Slow Streets” have popped up all over the District (to mixed results). And thousands of pedestrians and bicyclists took advantage of car-free Beach Drive after the National Park Service closed it to vehicles in order to create more space to traverse Rock Creek Park (parts of it are still closed to vehicles).

A slow street on S St NW near Connecticut Ave. Image by angela n. licensed under Creative Commons.

So far, most of these changes are just temporary, made to last until the State of Emergency is lifted. But taking space from vehicles and making it available to people could have benefits after the pandemic, and advocates for active transportation and public space have been asking for initiatives like this for years. District Department of Transportation officials have said that they are considering keeping some of them after the pandemic.

The purpose of the roundtable, according to the hearing notice, is to hear from the public and from DDOT about “what transportation initiatives that began during the pandemic should continue.”

The hearing will be held virtually on March 23 at 12 p.m. Members of the public can submit written testimony to the official record before April 6, or testify at the roundtable (contact info is in the public hearing notice).

What pandemic transportation initiatives do you want to see continue?

Continue the conversation about urbanism in the Washington region and support GGWash’s news and advocacy when you join the GGWash Neighborhood!

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the Baltimore suburbs and a writer for Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact. A Baltimore resident, Libby enjoys running and painting in her spare time.


Like Slow Streets, Streateries, or car-free Beach Drive? DC Council wants to hear about it.

A public roundtable on March 23 will focus on the creative transportation solutions DC has implemented during the pandemic, and whether they should carry on after it ends.

The roundtable will be hosted by Councilmember Mary Cheh, who is chair of the Committee on Transportation and the Environment. According to the public hearing notice, it will focus on:

  • Streateries
  • Bus-only lanes
  • Slow Streets
  • And whether the National Park Service should permanently close Beach Drive in Rock Creek Park to cars.

Cheh’s director of communications, Kelly Whittier, said the conversation has the potential to touch on bike lane infrastructure as well.

As COVID-19 made indoor gathering and crowds dangerous, DC officials turned their attention to creating more outdoor public space for residents to walk, ride bicycles, and dine while maintaining social distancing.

Special permits, valid only during DC’s State of Emergency, have allowed restaurants to expand outdoor space for dining, and have allowed for the creation of streateries and dining plazas.

Meanwhile, “Slow Streets” have popped up all over the District (to mixed results). And thousands of pedestrians and bicyclists took advantage of car-free Beach Drive after the National Park Service closed it to vehicles in order to create more space to traverse Rock Creek Park (parts of it are still closed to vehicles).

A slow street on S St NW near Connecticut Ave. Image by angela n. licensed under Creative Commons.

So far, most of these changes are just temporary, made to last until the State of Emergency is lifted. But taking space from vehicles and making it available to people could have benefits after the pandemic, and advocates for active transportation and public space have been asking for initiatives like this for years. District Department of Transportation officials have said that they are considering keeping some of them after the pandemic.

The purpose of the roundtable, according to the hearing notice, is to hear from the public and from DDOT about “what transportation initiatives that began during the pandemic should continue.”

The hearing will be held virtually on March 23 at 12 p.m. Members of the public can submit written testimony to the official record before April 6, or testify at the roundtable (contact info is in the public hearing notice).

What pandemic transportation initiatives do you want to see continue?

Continue the conversation about urbanism in the Washington region and support GGWash’s news and advocacy when you join the GGWash Neighborhood!

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the Baltimore suburbs and a writer for Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact. A Baltimore resident, Libby enjoys running and painting in her spare time.


Like Slow Streets, Streateries, or car-free Beach Drive? DC Council wants to hear about it.

A public roundtable on March 23 will focus on the creative transportation solutions DC has implemented during the pandemic, and whether they should carry on after it ends.

The roundtable will be hosted by Councilmember Mary Cheh, who is chair of the Committee on Transportation and the Environment. According to the public hearing notice, it will focus on:

  • Streateries
  • Bus-only lanes
  • Slow Streets
  • And whether the National Park Service should permanently close Beach Drive in Rock Creek Park to cars.

Cheh’s director of communications, Kelly Whittier, said the conversation has the potential to touch on bike lane infrastructure as well.

As COVID-19 made indoor gathering and crowds dangerous, DC officials turned their attention to creating more outdoor public space for residents to walk, ride bicycles, and dine while maintaining social distancing.

Special permits, valid only during DC’s State of Emergency, have allowed restaurants to expand outdoor space for dining, and have allowed for the creation of streateries and dining plazas.

Meanwhile, “Slow Streets” have popped up all over the District (to mixed results). And thousands of pedestrians and bicyclists took advantage of car-free Beach Drive after the National Park Service closed it to vehicles in order to create more space to traverse Rock Creek Park (parts of it are still closed to vehicles).

A slow street on S St NW near Connecticut Ave. Image by angela n. licensed under Creative Commons.

So far, most of these changes are just temporary, made to last until the State of Emergency is lifted. But taking space from vehicles and making it available to people could have benefits after the pandemic, and advocates for active transportation and public space have been asking for initiatives like this for years. District Department of Transportation officials have said that they are considering keeping some of them after the pandemic.

The purpose of the roundtable, according to the hearing notice, is to hear from the public and from DDOT about “what transportation initiatives that began during the pandemic should continue.”

The hearing will be held virtually on March 23 at 12 p.m. Members of the public can submit written testimony to the official record before April 6, or testify at the roundtable (contact info is in the public hearing notice).

What pandemic transportation initiatives do you want to see continue?

Continue the conversation about urbanism in the Washington region and support GGWash’s news and advocacy when you join the GGWash Neighborhood!

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the Baltimore suburbs and a writer for Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact. A Baltimore resident, Libby enjoys running and painting in her spare time.


Like Slow Streets, Streateries, or car-free Beach Drive? DC Council wants to hear about it.

A public roundtable on March 23 will focus on the creative transportation solutions DC has implemented during the pandemic, and whether they should carry on after it ends.

The roundtable will be hosted by Councilmember Mary Cheh, who is chair of the Committee on Transportation and the Environment. According to the public hearing notice, it will focus on:

  • Streateries
  • Bus-only lanes
  • Slow Streets
  • And whether the National Park Service should permanently close Beach Drive in Rock Creek Park to cars.

Cheh’s director of communications, Kelly Whittier, said the conversation has the potential to touch on bike lane infrastructure as well.

As COVID-19 made indoor gathering and crowds dangerous, DC officials turned their attention to creating more outdoor public space for residents to walk, ride bicycles, and dine while maintaining social distancing.

Special permits, valid only during DC’s State of Emergency, have allowed restaurants to expand outdoor space for dining, and have allowed for the creation of streateries and dining plazas.

Meanwhile, “Slow Streets” have popped up all over the District (to mixed results). And thousands of pedestrians and bicyclists took advantage of car-free Beach Drive after the National Park Service closed it to vehicles in order to create more space to traverse Rock Creek Park (parts of it are still closed to vehicles).

A slow street on S St NW near Connecticut Ave. Image by angela n. licensed under Creative Commons.

So far, most of these changes are just temporary, made to last until the State of Emergency is lifted. But taking space from vehicles and making it available to people could have benefits after the pandemic, and advocates for active transportation and public space have been asking for initiatives like this for years. District Department of Transportation officials have said that they are considering keeping some of them after the pandemic.

The purpose of the roundtable, according to the hearing notice, is to hear from the public and from DDOT about “what transportation initiatives that began during the pandemic should continue.”

The hearing will be held virtually on March 23 at 12 p.m. Members of the public can submit written testimony to the official record before April 6, or testify at the roundtable (contact info is in the public hearing notice).

What pandemic transportation initiatives do you want to see continue?

Continue the conversation about urbanism in the Washington region and support GGWash’s news and advocacy when you join the GGWash Neighborhood!

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the Baltimore suburbs and a writer for Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact. A Baltimore resident, Libby enjoys running and painting in her spare time.


Like Slow Streets, Streateries, or car-free Beach Drive? DC Council wants to hear about it.

A public roundtable on March 23 will focus on the creative transportation solutions DC has implemented during the pandemic, and whether they should carry on after it ends.

The roundtable will be hosted by Councilmember Mary Cheh, who is chair of the Committee on Transportation and the Environment. According to the public hearing notice, it will focus on:

  • Streateries
  • Bus-only lanes
  • Slow Streets
  • And whether the National Park Service should permanently close Beach Drive in Rock Creek Park to cars.

Cheh’s director of communications, Kelly Whittier, said the conversation has the potential to touch on bike lane infrastructure as well.

As COVID-19 made indoor gathering and crowds dangerous, DC officials turned their attention to creating more outdoor public space for residents to walk, ride bicycles, and dine while maintaining social distancing.

Special permits, valid only during DC’s State of Emergency, have allowed restaurants to expand outdoor space for dining, and have allowed for the creation of streateries and dining plazas.

Meanwhile, “Slow Streets” have popped up all over the District (to mixed results). And thousands of pedestrians and bicyclists took advantage of car-free Beach Drive after the National Park Service closed it to vehicles in order to create more space to traverse Rock Creek Park (parts of it are still closed to vehicles).

A slow street on S St NW near Connecticut Ave. Image by angela n. licensed under Creative Commons.

So far, most of these changes are just temporary, made to last until the State of Emergency is lifted. But taking space from vehicles and making it available to people could have benefits after the pandemic, and advocates for active transportation and public space have been asking for initiatives like this for years. District Department of Transportation officials have said that they are considering keeping some of them after the pandemic.

The purpose of the roundtable, according to the hearing notice, is to hear from the public and from DDOT about “what transportation initiatives that began during the pandemic should continue.”

The hearing will be held virtually on March 23 at 12 p.m. Members of the public can submit written testimony to the official record before April 6, or testify at the roundtable (contact info is in the public hearing notice).

What pandemic transportation initiatives do you want to see continue?

Continue the conversation about urbanism in the Washington region and support GGWash’s news and advocacy when you join the GGWash Neighborhood!

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the Baltimore suburbs and a writer for Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact. A Baltimore resident, Libby enjoys running and painting in her spare time.


Like Slow Streets, Streateries, or car-free Beach Drive? DC Council wants to hear about it.

A public roundtable on March 23 will focus on the creative transportation solutions DC has implemented during the pandemic, and whether they should carry on after it ends.

The roundtable will be hosted by Councilmember Mary Cheh, who is chair of the Committee on Transportation and the Environment. According to the public hearing notice, it will focus on:

  • Streateries
  • Bus-only lanes
  • Slow Streets
  • And whether the National Park Service should permanently close Beach Drive in Rock Creek Park to cars.

Cheh’s director of communications, Kelly Whittier, said the conversation has the potential to touch on bike lane infrastructure as well.

As COVID-19 made indoor gathering and crowds dangerous, DC officials turned their attention to creating more outdoor public space for residents to walk, ride bicycles, and dine while maintaining social distancing.

Special permits, valid only during DC’s State of Emergency, have allowed restaurants to expand outdoor space for dining, and have allowed for the creation of streateries and dining plazas.

Meanwhile, “Slow Streets” have popped up all over the District (to mixed results). And thousands of pedestrians and bicyclists took advantage of car-free Beach Drive after the National Park Service closed it to vehicles in order to create more space to traverse Rock Creek Park (parts of it are still closed to vehicles).

A slow street on S St NW near Connecticut Ave. Image by angela n. licensed under Creative Commons.

So far, most of these changes are just temporary, made to last until the State of Emergency is lifted. But taking space from vehicles and making it available to people could have benefits after the pandemic, and advocates for active transportation and public space have been asking for initiatives like this for years. District Department of Transportation officials have said that they are considering keeping some of them after the pandemic.

The purpose of the roundtable, according to the hearing notice, is to hear from the public and from DDOT about “what transportation initiatives that began during the pandemic should continue.”

The hearing will be held virtually on March 23 at 12 p.m. Members of the public can submit written testimony to the official record before April 6, or testify at the roundtable (contact info is in the public hearing notice).

What pandemic transportation initiatives do you want to see continue?

Continue the conversation about urbanism in the Washington region and support GGWash’s news and advocacy when you join the GGWash Neighborhood!

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the Baltimore suburbs and a writer for Johns Hopkins University’s Centers for Civic Impact. A Baltimore resident, Libby enjoys running and painting in her spare time.



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